Program #572

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Beyond Here Lies Nothin' . . . . . Together Through Life
MIKE BLOOMFIELD AND AL KOOPER . . . . . Mary Ann . . . . . Live Adventures Of Michael Bloomfield & Al Kooper
RAY CHARLES . . . . .You Be My Baby . . . . . Pure Genius: The Complete Atlantic Recordings (1952-1959)
WILLY DEVILLE . . . . . Since I Met You Baby . . . . . Live in Berlin
DAVE SITEK . . . . . With A Girl Like You . . . . . Dark Was the Night
VITESSE . . . . . Out Under Stars . . . . . You Win Again Gravity
PAUL SIMON . . . . . Another Galaxy . . . . . Surprise
PETER BJORN AND JOHN . . . . . Just The Past . . . . . Living Thing

BOB MOULD . . . . . Life And Times . . . . . Life and Times
RICHARD BUCKNER . . . . . Numbered . . . . . Meadow
NEKO CASE . . . . . The Pharaohs . . . . . Middle Cyclone
MARIANNE FAITHFULL . . . . . Hold On, Hold On . . . . . Easy Come, Easy Go
TELEVISION . . . . . Venus . . . . . Marquee Moon
THE VELVET UNDERGROUND . . . . . Sweet Jane . . . . .The Velvet Underground & Nico
NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS . . . . . Today's Lesson . . . . .Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!
THE ROLLINGS STONES . . . . . Stray Cat Blues . . . . .Beggars Banquet

THE WHO . . . . . Magic Bus . . . . . The Kids Are Alright
GOMEZ . . . . . Airstream Driver . . . . . A New Tide
FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE . . . . . The Valley Of Malls . . . . . Utopia Parkway
NICK LOWE . . . . . So It Goes . . . . . Jesus of Cool
A.C.NEWMAN . . . . . The Palace At 4 A.M. . . . . . Get Guilty
ROBYN HITCHCOCK & THE VENUS 3 . . . . . (Cause It's Love) Saint Parallelogram . . . . . Goodnight Oslo
THE CAESARS . . . . .  Strawberry Weed . . . . . Strawberry Weed
DAVE EDMUNDS . . . . . Every Time I See Her . . . . . Closer to the Flame
LITTLE RICHARD . . . . . The Girl Can't Help It . . . . . The Greatest Gold Hits
EDDIE BO . . . . . Baby I'm Wise . . . . . Check Mr. Popeye

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT . . . . . Rambler's Blues . . . . . A Stranger Here
THE GRATEFUL DEAD . . . . . Ramble On Rose . . . . . Europe 72
MARAH . . . . . Can't Take It With You . . . . . Angels of Destruction
CLARENCE WILLIAMS' BLUE FIVE (VOCAL BY EVA TAYLOR) . . . . . Papa De-Da-Da . . . . . Blues Masters, Vol. 11: Classic Blues Women
JOE HENRY . . . . . Tiny Voices . . . . . Tiny Voices

We started this time with a track from Bob Dylan's upcoming disc; it will be out at the end of the month, and from the sound of this one I'm definitely looking forward to hearing the rest. The tune has a familiar bluesy rhythm, which was also used to good effect a little over 40 years ago by Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper (who, of course, played with Dylan when he "went electric" at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965) during a three-night run at the Fillmore in San Francisco. They were covering a Ray Charles tune, and after one from the man himself it was on to a live track by Willy DeVille. At this point the set shifted gears, at least musically, with Dave Sitek's stately synthed-up take on old British Invasion hit from the Troggs. The digitized sounds continued with Vitesse, and then it was Paul Simon from the disc that Brian Eno helped to produce leading to one from the new Peter Bjorn and John album that's almost as catchy as "Young Folks."

The title track of Bob Mould's new disc has an edginess that seemed to flow nicely into a favorite from Richard Buckner, and from there it was Neko Case from her latest with a track that seems cut from the same cloth as the Neko tune covered by Marianne Faithfull from her newest (probably because the Sadies had a hand in writing both). The arrangement on that one brought to mind Television, which was followed by a Velvet Underground classic that led to a slightly lurid Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds tune about a Jane and her adventures with Mr. Sandman. Finally, it was the Rolling Stones heading off down the road to Sleazeville (not that there's anything wrong with that).

This next section began in an automotive place with the Who and Gomez, widened the cultural observations with Fountains of Wayne and Nick Lowe, became somewhat surreal with A.C. Newman and Robyn Hitchcock & the Venus 3, shifted and narrowed the focus to romance with the Caesars and Dave Edmunds, and finished with some wide-eyed New Orleans-flavored R&B from Little Richard and Eddie Bo—who passed away recently at age 78 after a long and successful career in music.

Ramblin' Jack Elliott has a new disc that sees him covering 10 Depression-era blues tunes; the one that kicked off this set is a Lonnie Johnson composition with a quite appropriate title and it flowed quite naturally into the Grateful Dead from a peak period for that band. From there it was Marah with a nice assemblage of horns on a bluesy track from their last one, and then it was back to 1925 for one from Clarence Willams' Blue Five, featuring among others Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet. The closer came from Joe Henry, the man who produced Ramblin' Jack Elliott's new disc.

Here's another one from Eddie Bo


Program #571

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE TEMPTATIONS . . . . . Cloud Nine . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
POCKET W/ ROBYN HITCHCOCK . . . . . Surround Him With Love . . . . . Surround Him With Love
DEEE-LITE . . . . . Groove Is In The Heart . . . . . The Very Best of Deee-Lite
JAMES BROWN . . . . . Get Up (I Feel Like Being A) Sex Machine . . . . . Star Time (4CD)
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . Be Easy . . . . . 100 Days, 100 Nights
KEITH RICHARDS . . . . . Hate It When You Leave . . . . . Main Offender
MARVIN GAYE . . . . . I Heard It Through The Grapevine . . . . . Marvin Gaye - Greatest Hits [1976]

FEIST & BEN GIBBARD . . . . . Train Song . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE PENTANGLE . . . . . I've Got A Feeling . . . . . Sweet Child
M. WARD . . . . . Rave On . . . . . Hold Time
THE BEATLES . . . . . Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues . . . . . Anthology 3
T-BONE WALKER . . . . . T-Bone Blues . . . . . T-Bone Blues
THE RACONTEURS . . . . . You Don't Understand Me . . . . . Consolers Of The Lonely
ROD STEWART . . . . . My Way Of Giving . . . . . Gasoline Alley
THE WALKMEN . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . A Hundred Miles Off
ZACHARY RICHARD . . . . . Ma Louisanne . . . . . Zack's Bon Ton

THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . I Just Wasn't Made For These Times . . . . . Pet Sounds
BERTRAND BURGALAT . . . . . Biscarrose . . . . . The Sssound of Mmmusic
LESLEY GORE . . . . . California Nights . . . . . Sunshine, Lollipops & Rainbows: The Best of Lesley Gore
STEREOLAB . . . . . The Ecstatic Static . . . . . Chemical Chords
HARRY NILSSON . . . . . One . . . . . Personal Best: The Harry Nilsson Anthology
NEKO CASE . . . . . Don't Forget Me . . . . . Middle Cyclone
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Sign On The Window . . . . . New Morning
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Hours Last Stand . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
RACHAEL YAMAGATA . . . . . Pause The Tragic Ending . . . . . Elephants...Teeth Sinking Into Heart (2 CD)

COCKTAIL SLIPPERS . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre
BLONDIE . . . . . Sunday Girl . . . . . Parallel Lines
THE RAMONES . . . . . I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend . . . . . Ramones
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . 7-11 . . . . . By-the-Numbers
THE CRYSTALS . . . . . Then He Kissed Me . . . . . Best of the Crystals
MEAT LOAF . . . . . You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth . . . . . Bat Out of Hell
MARY WEISS . . . . . Dangerous Game . . . . . Dangerous Game
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Thunder Road . . . . . Hammersmith Odeon, London '75 (2CD)

This program's opener began and ended with tunes featuring Uriel Jones on drums, who passed away recently at 74 years of age. He was one of the drummers with the Funk Brothers, which was the house band at Motown during the '60s and early '70s, meaning they were the musicians on all the hits that came out during that time. The Funk Brothers didn't get the name recognition they should have back in the day, but that changed for the better after the film documentary on them appeared in 2002 and they went on tour soon afterword. So it was the Temptations to start, with the first track featuring Dennis Edwards after he replace David Ruffin in the group. From there it was a new tune by Richard Jankovich (aka Pocket), who will be releasing a series of singles over the course of this year in which he will work with a varying cast of musicians; this first one features Robyn Hitchcock on vocals. The danceable rhythms on that one comjured up Deee-Lite, and then it was on to James Brown and one of those tracks where he's having a conversation with his band throughout. Some more r&b/funk from Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings last one led to Keith Richards working in something of an Al Green mode, which seemed to flow quite nicely into Marvin Gaye to finish up.

The next section started with the collaboration between Feist and Ben Gibbard that's part of the two-disc set that appeared back in February featuring an expansive roster of artists who all donated their efforts to raising awareness and funds for the continuing battle to someday eradicate HIV. The acoustic feel of that track flowed well into one from the Pentangle, which in turn meshed nicely with M. Ward's totally rethought approach to an old Buddy Holly tune. Then it was the Beatles with a bluesy approach to another tune popularized by Holly followed by the sublime blues of T-Bone Walker. The Raconteurs sounding an awful lot like the Faces led to Rod Stewart from his second solo disc covering a Small Faces tune, with the members of the Faces accompanying him on the track. That one's organic sound brought to mind the Walkmen, who were followed by Zachary Richard with a tune about the same place that brought a welcome shot of zydeco to the proceedings.

The Beach Boys at one of their creative peaks from 40-odd years ago led to some 21st century French pop by Bertrand Burgalat that certainly captures a bit of that wistful feel heard in the Lesley Gore track that followed. I also hear a bit of Beach Boys in the Stereolab tune, which ends on a keyboard rhythm that segued perfectly into an early one from Harry Nilsson. Then it was Neko Case with a heartfelt cover of a different Nilsson tune featuring Garth Hudson of the Band on piano, which brought on Bob Dylan from the days when he was living in Woodstock (not too long after he spent countless hours jamming with the Band up there). From there it was a desperate Elvis Perkins off his latest disc feeding into Rachael Yamagata trying to stave off the inevitable.

Cocktail Slippers are a five-woman band from Norway who have connected with Steve Van Zandt for their upcoming new disc; the appealing title track has a number of influences buried inside, some more obvious than others, and it's safe to say that Blondie falls in the former category. New York City compatriots the Ramones followed with a sweet one from their self-titled debut (all those years ago), and then it was the Postmarks covering the boys from Queens on last year's disc full of other people's tunes. The nod to Phil Spector's teenage anthems brought on the real McCoy from the Crystals followed by Meat Loaf in full-blown Wall of Sound regalia. And then it was Mary Weiss from her excellent comeback disc of a few years back flowing into Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, of course including Miami Steve, to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one from the Funk Brothers w/ Joan Osborne (from the documentary)


Program #570

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
PJ HARVEY . . . . . Black Hearted Love . . . . . A Woman A Man Walked By
MISSION OF BURMA . . . . . Falling . . . . . Onoffon
IT HUGS BACK . . . . . Now & Again . . . . . Inside Your Guitar
GUIDED BY VOICES . . . . . Fair Touching . . . . . Isolation Drills
EDDIE & THE HOT RODS . . . . . Do Anything You Wanna Do . . . . . Teenage Kicks
PAUL WELLER . . . . . A Bullet For Everyone . . . . . Illumination [Limited Edition w/ Bonus DVD]
MARK PICKEREL AND HIS PRAYING HANDS . . . . . Cody’s Dream . . . . . Cody's Dream
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . The Jean Genie . . . . . Aladdin Sane - 30th Anniversary Edition

CLEM SNIDE . . . . . Beard Of Bees . . . . . Hungry Bird
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Come And Find Me . . . . . Golden Age of Radio
DONOVAN . . . . . Colours . . . . . Donovan's Greatest Hits
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . Deep Blue Sea . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . Myriad Harbour . . . . . Challengers
JOHN CALE . . . . . Things . . . . . Hobo Sapiens
M. WARD . . . . . Stars Of Leo . . . . . Hold Time
WILCO . . . . . Muzzle Of Bees . . . . . A Ghost Is Born

GENERATION X . . . . . Ready Steady Go . . . . . Perfect Hits 1975-1981
THE KINKS . . . . . Top Of The Pops . . . . . Lola versus Powerman and the Money-Go-Round, Part One
RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . Lonely At The Top . . . . . Sail Away
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Send My Fond Regards To Lonelyville . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
JOSEPH ARTHUR . . . . . Morning Cup . . . . . Could We Survive (Dig)
CAT STEVENS . . . . . On The Road To Find Out . . . . . Tea for the Tillerman
DEVOTCHKA . . . . . New World . . . . . A Mad and Faithful Telling

BO DIDDLEY . . . . . You Can’t Judge A Book By It’s Cover . . . . . The Story of Bo Diddley: The Very Best of Bo Diddley
ELVIS COSTELLO & THE ATTRACTIONS . . . . . Every Day I Write The Book . . . . . Punch the Clock
THE MONOTONES . . . . . The Book Of Love . . . . . The Best of Chess Rock & Roll, Vol. 2
SPOON . . . . . The Book I Write . . . . . Stranger Than Fiction
CALEXICO . . . . . Writer’s Holiday . . . . . Carried to Dust
MINIBAR . . . . . Holiday From Myself . . . . . Road Movies
THE BEATLES . . . . . Magical Mystery Tour . . . . . Magical Mystery Tour
VAMPIRE WEEKEND . . . . . Walcott . . . . . Vampire Weekend
SPARKS . . . . . This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us . . . . . Kimono My House
THE CAESARS . . . . . In Orbit . . . . . Strawberry Weed

This show got off to a brooding start with a track from PJ Harvey's latest disc; her music at times brings up Mission of Burma for me, and they injected an energy boost that pretty much remained throughout the set. So we had a new one from It Hugs Back, who are all about the guitars and therefore fed nicely into Guided By Voices. An old favorite from the late '70s by Eddie and the Hot Rods was followed by Paul Weller expressing some anger, as he has been known to do on occasion in his career. I find the guitar rhythm on that one is similar to the title track from last year's disc by Mark Pickerel and His Praying Hands, and that tune also has a bit of David Bowie in it, which is why we ended up there.

A lovely but sad tune from Clem Snide began this section and led to some early Josh Ritter that has a beautiful, flowing feel, much like the Donovan tune that followed. A new one from Grizzly Bear introduced a bit of melancholy, but only for a moment, as the New Pornographers added a lighter touch that was maintained by John Cale and then M. Ward, with one of the few tracks from his new disc that hadn't yet made it into the semi-weekly mix. At the end was Wilco, with a tune that brought us full circle through both its mood and its title.

Whenever there's a tune that's running around my head I can usually trace it to something I've recently read, seen or heard. Sometimes, however, songs just appear out of thin air, as was the case with the Generation X tune about an old British pop music TV show that began this set. That led to the Kinks singing about the experience of watching a record climb the charts, which in turn brought Randy Newman's take on what it's like after you've hit it big. That state of mind is probably not the same Lonelyville that Elvis Perkins is singing about on his new disc, but the tunes seemed to work pretty well back to back. There's a rhythmic strumming at the base of the Elvis Perkins tune that brought to mind Joseph Arthur from one of the four EPs he put out last year, and both tracks can be heard in the old Cat Stevens song that followed. Finishing it off was DeVotchKa, with what's turned out to be my favorite track from last year's very appealing disc.

I recently had a chance to see Cadillac Records, which I liked, but I couldn't help noticing how many Chess artists weren't mentioned at all in the story it told. I'm guessing they could only fit as many people as they did into a normal length film, but clearly there were some pretty important names missing. One for sure was Bo Diddley, and the track that kicked off this final section sent us down something of a literary path, at least for the opening portion. So we had Elvis Costello & the Attractions with an alternate, more stripped-down version of one his more poppy numbers, the Monotones with their big hit from 1958 and Spoon with one that can be found on the Stranger Than Fiction soundtrack. From there a bit of hitting the road slowly worked its way into the theme, starting with Calexico taking a break from the rigors of writing, Minibar taking a break from themselves and the Beatles adding some magic to the mix. Then it was Vampire Weekend with a great rollicking track about beating feet from Cape Cod for New Jersey, which conjured up an old Sparks tune about a potential showdown if one party doesn't leave, and then it was on to the Caesars leaving the planet altogether (metaphorically speaking, of course).

Here's another one from Vampire Weekend


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