Program #597

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE JACKSON 5 . . . . . I Want You Back . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
THE JACKSON 5 . . . . . ABC . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
THE JACKSON 5 . . . . . The Love You Save . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
JAMES BROWN . . . . . I Got You (I Feel Good) . . . . . Star Time (4CD)
THE MIRACLES . . . . . Going To A Go-Go . . . . . Motown: The Classic Years
MARVIN GAYE . . . . . Too Busy Thinking About My Baby . . . . . The Best of Marvin Gaye (Motown Anthology Series)
THE TEMPTATIONS . . . . . Ain’t Too Proud To Beg . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
STEVIE WONDER . . . . . He’s Mistra Know-It-All . . . . . Innervisions
MICHAEL JACKSON . . . . . Rock With You . . . . . Off the Wall

RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . A Wedding In Cherokee County . . . . . Good Old Boys
THOSE DARLINS . . . . . Glass To You . . . . . Those Darlins
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Dark Hand Of Contagion . . . . . Killingsworth
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Dear Doctor . . . . . Beggars Banquet
THE LEMONHEADS . . . . . I Just Can’t Take It Anymore . . . . . Varshons
THE BYRDS . . . . . I’ll Feel A Whole Lot Better . . . . . The Byrds
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . Save . . . . . Man-Made
JOHN DOE & THE SADIES . . . . . Husbands And Waves . . . . . Country Club
NICK LOWE . . . . . Bygones (Won’t Go) . . . . . The Convincer
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Forests And Sands . . . . . My Maudlin Career

THE BEATLES . . . . . When I’m Sixty Four . . . . . Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Remastered)
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . I Loved London . . . . . The London Book of the Dead
THE CLIMAX BLUES BAND . . . . . Mole On The Dole . . . . . All You Are Is A Human Sir
ALL SMILES . . . . . All You Are Is A Human Sir . . . . . All You Are Is A Human Sir
ELLIOTT SMITH . . . . . A Passing Feeling . . . . . From a Basement on the Hill
VIC CONRAD & THE FIRST THIRD . . . . . Enough Of This . . . . . Vic Conrad and the First Third
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Leftovers . . . . . Further Complications

THE DAVE BRUBECK QUARTET . . . . . Take Five . . . . . Time Out -50th Anniversary (2 CD/1 DVD Legacy Edition)
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . Southern Point . . . . . Veckatimest
RAYMOND SCOTT . . . . . Powerhouse . . . . . The Music of Raymond Scott: Reckless Nights & Turkish Twilights
THE BONZO DOG BAND . . . . . Mickey’s Son And Daughter . . . . . Cornology [3CD Set]
TODD RUNDGREN . . . . . Onomatopoeia . . . . . Hermit of Mink Hollow
VAMPIRE WEEKEND . . . . . Oxford Comma . . . . . Vampire Weekend
THE 1910 FRUITGUM COMPANY . . . . . 1, 2, 3 Red Light . . . . . The Best of the 1910 Fruitgum Company: Simon Says
DAVE SITEK . . . . . With A Girl Like You . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE MAGNETIC FIELDS . . . . . I’ll Dream Alone . . . . . Distortion

My initial reaction upon hearing of Michael Jackson's death was one of great sadness—in a complex world his was a particularly complicated life, and it seems another example of the strange ratio that seems to exist in the entertainment world between innate talent and sorrow and pain. However, I was quickly overcome by a strong sense of nostalgia, and that's because generally I'm not particularly fond of Michael Jackson's music, at least his output as an adult. The Jackson 5's music, however, is something else. It brings me right back to a place where my musical tastes were expanding and changing beyond the Top 40, which ruled the airwaves in the '60s and featured most of the best stuff in pop music that came out of that decade (at least until the final years). The Jackson 5 coincides with the end of that era, for me and for Top 40 radio. Motown was a big part of that decade, so we heard a selection of tracks from that label's artists, starting with the first three Jackson 5 singles; I still find them irresistable, and all went to the top of the charts in first six months of 1970. The one ringer in the group was James Brown's second big hit from 1965; even back in the day it was clear to me that eleven-year-old Michael Jackson was doing a killer James Brown imitation. And we finished with the one Michael Jackson tune from his solo work that has always worked for me; for some reason it hooked me in from the first time I heard the track, and I still enjoy it to this day.

The next section began with Randy Newman and my favorite love song ever, which led to new music from Those Darlins with a tune that's set in similar environs. The Minus 5 followed with another new one that immediately conjured up an old Rolling Stones track when I first heard it. From there we heard the Lemonheads covering a Gram Parsons tune followed by the Byrds from their early days (before Parsons joined them) into one from the last Teenage Fanclub disc that has a bit of that old Byrds feel. John Doe & the Sadies covering Roger Miller fed nicely into Nick Lowe on pretty much the same subject, and then it was Camera Obscura from their excellent recent disc with one that has a slight country touch, which made it fit in quite well with all that preceded it.

Even though he passed by 64 several years ago, Paul McCartney's recent birthday was the inspiration for the Beatles track that opened this set. The Real Tuesday Weld followed with a tune that shares an old-time music hall sensibility, and then we had the Climax Blues Band with a kind of shuffling blues with a clarinet that wouldn't have sounded out of place on either track that preceded it. A new one from All Smiles had a similar beat even as JIm Fairchild's vocals brought to mind Elliott Smith. The mood grew more meloncholy with Vic Conrad & the First Third before Jarvis Cocker indulging his fondness for mixing science with rock 'n' roll finished up.

The 50th anniversary of Dave Brubeck's masterpiece has seen a re-release of the disc with added tracks from various Newport Jazz Festivals as a bonus. Here we began with the tune that for a time was ubiquitous 50 years ago, which seemed to feed quite well into one that's become a favorite from the new Grizzly Bear disc. From there we went back even further in time, some 70 years to the period when Raymond Scott was recording with his quintet. If the track we heard sounded familiar, it probably means you're a fan of Warner Brothers cartoons; the studio licensed Scott's music and used it for decades in many of its classic shorts. The Bonzo Dog Band followed with what sounds to me like a cartoon in musical form, and then it was Todd Rundgren with another track that always makes me think of my favorite animated bits, even if it really is a love song at heart. The English grammar aspect of that one led to Vampire Weekend, and something about the keyboards in that track brought to mind the '60s bubblegum music of the 1910 Fruitgum Company. Dave Sitek offered his remake of an old Troggs tune from around the same time period, and then the Magnetic Fields brought down the curtain with one from their last disc.

Here's another one from James Brown


Program #596

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
WILCO . . . . . Wilco (The Song) . . . . . Wilco (The Album)
THE PROFESSIONALS . . . . . Join The Professionals . . . . . I Didn't See It Coming
ART BRUT . . . . . Formed A Band . . . . . Bang Bang Rock & Roll
THE KINKS . . . . . Top Of The Pops . . . . . Lola versus Powerman and the Money-Go-Round, Part One
THE RASPBERRIES . . . . . Hit Record . . . . . Capitol Collectors Series
THE RAMONES . . . . . Do You Remember Rock ’N’ Roll Radio? . . . . . End of the Century
IAN HUNTER . . . . . Cleveland Rocks . . . . . You're Never Alone with a Schizophrenic
RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . Burn On . . . . . Sail Away

THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . 8 More Days To The Fourth Of July . . . . . We Belong to the Staggering Evening
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Rip This Joing . . . . . Exile on Main St.
LITTLE RICHARD . . . . . Jenny Jenny . . . . . Very Best Of Little Richard
EELS . . . . . What’s A Fella Gotta Do? . . . . . Hombre Lobo: 12 Songs of Desire
JANIS JOPLIN . . . . . Move Over . . . . . Pearl
THE BLACK KEYS . . . . . So He Won’t Hurt . . . . . Attack and Release
BETTY LAVETTE . . . . . Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby . . . . .
JIMMY SMITH . . . . . Sometimes I’m Happy . . . . . Mercury Records Jazz Story
BOB DYLAN . . . . . I Feel A Change Coming On . . . . . Together Through Life

THE LEMONHEADS . . . . . Hey, That’s No Way To Say Goodbye . . . . . Varshons
CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG . . . . . Everything I Can’t See . . . . . 5:55
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . New York City Serenade . . . . . The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle
HEADLESS HEROES . . . . . Nobody’s Baby Now . . . . . The Silence of Love
MARIANNE FAITHFULL . . . . . I’ll Keep It With Mine . . . . . Broken English/Strange Weather

THE YARDBIRDS . . . . . Happenings Ten Years Time Ago . . . . . Happenings Ten Years Time Ago 1964-1968
THE PLIMSOULS . . . . . A Million Miles Away . . . . . Everywhere at Once
THE GEORGE USHER GROUP . . . . . A Crowded Mind . . . . . Days of Plenty
ALL SMILES . . . . . I Was Never The One . . . . . I Was Never the One
MARTIN NEWELL . . . . . Cinnamon Blonde . . . . . A Summer Tamarind
BIG STAR . . . . . September Gurls . . . . . #1 Record/Radio City
THE MURMAIDS . . . . . Popsicles And Icicles . . . . . The Best of the Girl Groups, Vol. 2
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Slush . . . . . Further Complications
TALKING HEADS . . . . . This Must Be The Place (Naïve Melody) . . . . . Speaking in Tongues

Wilco (the band) from the new disc Wilco (The Album) opened this program with "Wilco (The Song)", which opens their disc as well. Offering reassurances to Wilco fans that the group will always be there for them if they need a shoulder to lean on, it brought to mind an old tune from the Professionals. That band from the early '80s included Steve Jones and Paul Cook of the Sex Pistols, and they seemed to be inviting their fans to become part of the new (at the time) enterprise with this early track. Cook and Jones joined Paul Simonon of the Clash in a version of the Professionals that performed the song in a film called Ladies and Gentleman, the Fabulous Stains; they were called the Looters, were fronted by the actor Ray Winstone and I actually prefer that version to the one we heard. However, although the film, which stars a teenage Diane Lane, was released on DVD last year, the soundtrack wasn't made available. The only way to hear the Looters version of this tune is to rent the film, which is basically mediocre but has its moments, especially when the band is perfoming. After the Professionals we heard Art Brut amazed that they are, in fact, a functioning group, and then it was the Kinks with an intimate look at what it's like when your record starts to climb the charts. The Raspberries hopeful that their time will come led to the Ramones with a musical question on a track that features a radio DJ on the front and back end, which made for a perfect segue into Alan Freed at the top of the Ian Hunter tune that followed. And while Cleveland certainly rocks, it also recently celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Cuyahoga River catching on fire, which helped jumpstart the environmental awareness that is now a part of everyday life here on planet Earth (Forty years ago the EPA hadn't yet been created.). So we marked that anniversary with a Randy Newman song written a few years after the river went up in flames, which was clearly the inspiration for the tune.

The next section began with an Ike Reilly Assassination tune that highlights a day on the calendar that passed during this program's run, and the rollicking sound on that one conjured up an old Rolling Stones track that certainly has roots in the even older Little Richard song that followed. Richard's pleas were echoed by Eels on a track from their latest disc, and the beat on that one recalled an old Janis Joplin favorite. From there we heard some blues from the Black Keys feeding into Bettye LaVette covering Jimmy Reed, which brought on Jimmy Smith putting his Hammond B-3 through its paces and Bob Dylan with what has clearly become my favorite from his new disc.

An interesting choice of song from the Lemonheads kicked off this set; that was Liv Tyler trading off vocals with Evan Dando, which brought to mind Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin, so then we heard their daughter Charlotte from her last disc. The piano on that one fed nicely into a favorite from Bruce Springsteen's early days, and the romantic moodiness of that track was reflected in the Headless Heroes tune that followed before Marianne Faithfull covering Bob Dylan brought things to a suitably melancholy conclusion.

The finale began with tracks from the Yardbirds and the Plimsouls, two bands linked by the fact that both appeared in movies (Blow-Up and Valley Girl) that did a more than reasonable job of reflecting the pop culture of the moment. From there it was on to the George Usher Group with a tune that came to mind after I first heard the new All Smiles track that followed. There was a little bit of Martin Newell in that All Smiles song as well, and then it was Big Star's guitar pop gem into an old one-hit wonder from late 1963 by the Murmaids. That one's title led to Jarvis Cocker describing the state of his cold heart after meeting the right girl, and then we heard Talking Heads finding that sweet spot to bring down the curtain.

Here are the Professionals in Looters disguise


Program #595

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE . . . . . It Must Be Summer . . . . . Utopia Parkway
CHRIS STAMEY . . . . . Summer Sun . . . . . D.I.Y.: Come Out And Play - American Power Pop (1975-78)
JONATHAN RICHMAN & THE MODERN LOVERS . . . . . That Summer Feeling . . . . . Jonathan Sings
CHAD & JEREMY . . . . . A Summer Song . . . . . The British Invasion: History of British Rock, Vol. 1
THE YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS . . . . . Summerland . . . . . Because We Hate You/Let the War Against Music Begin
MARTIN NEWELL . . . . . Green-Gold Girl Of Summer . . . . . The Greatest Living Englishman
THE FLAMING LIPS . . . . . It’s Summertime . . . . . Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots
JANE’S ADDICTION . . . . . Summertime Rolls . . . . . Nothing's Shocking
THE JANUARIES . . . . . Summer Of Love . . . . . The Januaries

JOHNNY RIVERS . . . . . Summer Rain . . . . . Secret Agent Man: The Ultimate Johnny Rivers Anthology 1964-2006
FRANK SINATRA . . . . . Summer Wind . . . . . Nothing But The Best
EVAN DANDO & SABRINA BROOKE . . . . . Summer Wine . . . . . Total Lee! The Songs of Lee Hazlewood
YO LA TENGO . . . . . The Summer . . . . . Fakebook
BELLE AND SEBASTIAN . . . . . A Summer Wasting . . . . . The Boy with the Arab Strap
MARIANNE FAITHFULL . . . . . Summer Nights . . . . . Marianne Faithfull's Greatest Hits
DEPARTMENT OF EAGLES . . . . . Balmy Night . . . . . In Ear Park
JOSH ROUSE . . . . . Summertime . . . . . Subtitulo
ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM . . . . . The Girl From Ipanema . . . . . The Girl From Ipanema: The Antonio Carlos Jobim Songbook
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Surfer Girl . . . . . Sounds Of Summer - The Very Best Of The Beach Boys
THE RAMONES . . . . . Rockaway Beach . . . . . Rocket to Russia
SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY JUKES . . . . . On The Beach . . . . . Restless Heart
LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III . . . . . The Swimming Song . . . . . Attempted Mustache
BLOTTO . . . . . I Wanna Be A Lifeguard . . . . . Collected Works

ART BRUT . . . . . Summer Job . . . . . Art Brut vs. Satan
LAND OF TALK . . . . . Summer Special . . . . . Applause Cheer Boo Hiss
THE BREAKUP SOCIETY . . . . . The Summer Of Joycelyn May . . . . . James at 35
THE WHO . . . . . Summertime Blues . . . . . Monterey International Pop Festival
NRBQ . . . . . Rain At The Drive-in . . . . . Grooves in Orbit
THE RASPBERRIES . . . . . Drivin’ Around . . . . . Capitol Collectors Series
THE DRIFTERS . . . . . Under The Boardwalk . . . . . The Incredible Soul Collection
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Girls In Their Summer Clothes . . . . . Magic
PERCY FAITH . . . . . Theme From “A Summer Place” . . . . . Percy Faith's Greatest Hits
SAINT ETIENNE . . . . . Summerisle . . . . . Finisterre
THE STYLE COUNCIL . . . . . Long Hot Summer . . . . . Long Hot Summer
SLY & THE FAMILY STONE . . . . . Hot Fun In The Summertime . . . . . Essential Sly & Family Stone
MARTHA & THE VANDELLAS . . . . . Dancing In The Streets . . . . . Motown: The Classic Years

It seems for most of us that the personal summer soundtracks we recall are more about the songs of the moment than anything directly related to those three months that come around in the middle of each year. At the same time, the season has inspired more tunes than the other three periods of the year combined. So it creates a conflict, at least when it comes to programming a radio show celebrating the onset of summer. Do we hear my favorite songs from past summers, or instead sample from the wide selection available that are directly related to the season itself?

In the past I've chosen the latter route, and as you can see from this playlist I decided once again to stick with that idea. Perhaps it's a little less intimate, but it certainly feels more inclusive and, perhaps most important of all, I really enjoy playing and listening to these songs. I hope you did as well.

Here's one more summer song


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