Program #571

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE TEMPTATIONS . . . . . Cloud Nine . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
POCKET W/ ROBYN HITCHCOCK . . . . . Surround Him With Love . . . . . Surround Him With Love
DEEE-LITE . . . . . Groove Is In The Heart . . . . . The Very Best of Deee-Lite
JAMES BROWN . . . . . Get Up (I Feel Like Being A) Sex Machine . . . . . Star Time (4CD)
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . Be Easy . . . . . 100 Days, 100 Nights
KEITH RICHARDS . . . . . Hate It When You Leave . . . . . Main Offender
MARVIN GAYE . . . . . I Heard It Through The Grapevine . . . . . Marvin Gaye - Greatest Hits [1976]

FEIST & BEN GIBBARD . . . . . Train Song . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE PENTANGLE . . . . . I've Got A Feeling . . . . . Sweet Child
M. WARD . . . . . Rave On . . . . . Hold Time
THE BEATLES . . . . . Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues . . . . . Anthology 3
T-BONE WALKER . . . . . T-Bone Blues . . . . . T-Bone Blues
THE RACONTEURS . . . . . You Don't Understand Me . . . . . Consolers Of The Lonely
ROD STEWART . . . . . My Way Of Giving . . . . . Gasoline Alley
THE WALKMEN . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . A Hundred Miles Off
ZACHARY RICHARD . . . . . Ma Louisanne . . . . . Zack's Bon Ton

THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . I Just Wasn't Made For These Times . . . . . Pet Sounds
BERTRAND BURGALAT . . . . . Biscarrose . . . . . The Sssound of Mmmusic
LESLEY GORE . . . . . California Nights . . . . . Sunshine, Lollipops & Rainbows: The Best of Lesley Gore
STEREOLAB . . . . . The Ecstatic Static . . . . . Chemical Chords
HARRY NILSSON . . . . . One . . . . . Personal Best: The Harry Nilsson Anthology
NEKO CASE . . . . . Don't Forget Me . . . . . Middle Cyclone
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Sign On The Window . . . . . New Morning
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Hours Last Stand . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
RACHAEL YAMAGATA . . . . . Pause The Tragic Ending . . . . . Elephants...Teeth Sinking Into Heart (2 CD)

COCKTAIL SLIPPERS . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre
BLONDIE . . . . . Sunday Girl . . . . . Parallel Lines
THE RAMONES . . . . . I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend . . . . . Ramones
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . 7-11 . . . . . By-the-Numbers
THE CRYSTALS . . . . . Then He Kissed Me . . . . . Best of the Crystals
MEAT LOAF . . . . . You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth . . . . . Bat Out of Hell
MARY WEISS . . . . . Dangerous Game . . . . . Dangerous Game
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Thunder Road . . . . . Hammersmith Odeon, London '75 (2CD)

This program's opener began and ended with tunes featuring Uriel Jones on drums, who passed away recently at 74 years of age. He was one of the drummers with the Funk Brothers, which was the house band at Motown during the '60s and early '70s, meaning they were the musicians on all the hits that came out during that time. The Funk Brothers didn't get the name recognition they should have back in the day, but that changed for the better after the film documentary on them appeared in 2002 and they went on tour soon afterword. So it was the Temptations to start, with the first track featuring Dennis Edwards after he replace David Ruffin in the group. From there it was a new tune by Richard Jankovich (aka Pocket), who will be releasing a series of singles over the course of this year in which he will work with a varying cast of musicians; this first one features Robyn Hitchcock on vocals. The danceable rhythms on that one comjured up Deee-Lite, and then it was on to James Brown and one of those tracks where he's having a conversation with his band throughout. Some more r&b/funk from Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings last one led to Keith Richards working in something of an Al Green mode, which seemed to flow quite nicely into Marvin Gaye to finish up.

The next section started with the collaboration between Feist and Ben Gibbard that's part of the two-disc set that appeared back in February featuring an expansive roster of artists who all donated their efforts to raising awareness and funds for the continuing battle to someday eradicate HIV. The acoustic feel of that track flowed well into one from the Pentangle, which in turn meshed nicely with M. Ward's totally rethought approach to an old Buddy Holly tune. Then it was the Beatles with a bluesy approach to another tune popularized by Holly followed by the sublime blues of T-Bone Walker. The Raconteurs sounding an awful lot like the Faces led to Rod Stewart from his second solo disc covering a Small Faces tune, with the members of the Faces accompanying him on the track. That one's organic sound brought to mind the Walkmen, who were followed by Zachary Richard with a tune about the same place that brought a welcome shot of zydeco to the proceedings.

The Beach Boys at one of their creative peaks from 40-odd years ago led to some 21st century French pop by Bertrand Burgalat that certainly captures a bit of that wistful feel heard in the Lesley Gore track that followed. I also hear a bit of Beach Boys in the Stereolab tune, which ends on a keyboard rhythm that segued perfectly into an early one from Harry Nilsson. Then it was Neko Case with a heartfelt cover of a different Nilsson tune featuring Garth Hudson of the Band on piano, which brought on Bob Dylan from the days when he was living in Woodstock (not too long after he spent countless hours jamming with the Band up there). From there it was a desperate Elvis Perkins off his latest disc feeding into Rachael Yamagata trying to stave off the inevitable.

Cocktail Slippers are a five-woman band from Norway who have connected with Steve Van Zandt for their upcoming new disc; the appealing title track has a number of influences buried inside, some more obvious than others, and it's safe to say that Blondie falls in the former category. New York City compatriots the Ramones followed with a sweet one from their self-titled debut (all those years ago), and then it was the Postmarks covering the boys from Queens on last year's disc full of other people's tunes. The nod to Phil Spector's teenage anthems brought on the real McCoy from the Crystals followed by Meat Loaf in full-blown Wall of Sound regalia. And then it was Mary Weiss from her excellent comeback disc of a few years back flowing into Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, of course including Miami Steve, to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one from the Funk Brothers w/ Joan Osborne (from the documentary)


Program #570

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
PJ HARVEY . . . . . Black Hearted Love . . . . . A Woman A Man Walked By
MISSION OF BURMA . . . . . Falling . . . . . Onoffon
IT HUGS BACK . . . . . Now & Again . . . . . Inside Your Guitar
GUIDED BY VOICES . . . . . Fair Touching . . . . . Isolation Drills
EDDIE & THE HOT RODS . . . . . Do Anything You Wanna Do . . . . . Teenage Kicks
PAUL WELLER . . . . . A Bullet For Everyone . . . . . Illumination [Limited Edition w/ Bonus DVD]
MARK PICKEREL AND HIS PRAYING HANDS . . . . . Cody’s Dream . . . . . Cody's Dream
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . The Jean Genie . . . . . Aladdin Sane - 30th Anniversary Edition

CLEM SNIDE . . . . . Beard Of Bees . . . . . Hungry Bird
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Come And Find Me . . . . . Golden Age of Radio
DONOVAN . . . . . Colours . . . . . Donovan's Greatest Hits
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . Deep Blue Sea . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . Myriad Harbour . . . . . Challengers
JOHN CALE . . . . . Things . . . . . Hobo Sapiens
M. WARD . . . . . Stars Of Leo . . . . . Hold Time
WILCO . . . . . Muzzle Of Bees . . . . . A Ghost Is Born

GENERATION X . . . . . Ready Steady Go . . . . . Perfect Hits 1975-1981
THE KINKS . . . . . Top Of The Pops . . . . . Lola versus Powerman and the Money-Go-Round, Part One
RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . Lonely At The Top . . . . . Sail Away
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Send My Fond Regards To Lonelyville . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
JOSEPH ARTHUR . . . . . Morning Cup . . . . . Could We Survive (Dig)
CAT STEVENS . . . . . On The Road To Find Out . . . . . Tea for the Tillerman
DEVOTCHKA . . . . . New World . . . . . A Mad and Faithful Telling

BO DIDDLEY . . . . . You Can’t Judge A Book By It’s Cover . . . . . The Story of Bo Diddley: The Very Best of Bo Diddley
ELVIS COSTELLO & THE ATTRACTIONS . . . . . Every Day I Write The Book . . . . . Punch the Clock
THE MONOTONES . . . . . The Book Of Love . . . . . The Best of Chess Rock & Roll, Vol. 2
SPOON . . . . . The Book I Write . . . . . Stranger Than Fiction
CALEXICO . . . . . Writer’s Holiday . . . . . Carried to Dust
MINIBAR . . . . . Holiday From Myself . . . . . Road Movies
THE BEATLES . . . . . Magical Mystery Tour . . . . . Magical Mystery Tour
VAMPIRE WEEKEND . . . . . Walcott . . . . . Vampire Weekend
SPARKS . . . . . This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us . . . . . Kimono My House
THE CAESARS . . . . . In Orbit . . . . . Strawberry Weed

This show got off to a brooding start with a track from PJ Harvey's latest disc; her music at times brings up Mission of Burma for me, and they injected an energy boost that pretty much remained throughout the set. So we had a new one from It Hugs Back, who are all about the guitars and therefore fed nicely into Guided By Voices. An old favorite from the late '70s by Eddie and the Hot Rods was followed by Paul Weller expressing some anger, as he has been known to do on occasion in his career. I find the guitar rhythm on that one is similar to the title track from last year's disc by Mark Pickerel and His Praying Hands, and that tune also has a bit of David Bowie in it, which is why we ended up there.

A lovely but sad tune from Clem Snide began this section and led to some early Josh Ritter that has a beautiful, flowing feel, much like the Donovan tune that followed. A new one from Grizzly Bear introduced a bit of melancholy, but only for a moment, as the New Pornographers added a lighter touch that was maintained by John Cale and then M. Ward, with one of the few tracks from his new disc that hadn't yet made it into the semi-weekly mix. At the end was Wilco, with a tune that brought us full circle through both its mood and its title.

Whenever there's a tune that's running around my head I can usually trace it to something I've recently read, seen or heard. Sometimes, however, songs just appear out of thin air, as was the case with the Generation X tune about an old British pop music TV show that began this set. That led to the Kinks singing about the experience of watching a record climb the charts, which in turn brought Randy Newman's take on what it's like after you've hit it big. That state of mind is probably not the same Lonelyville that Elvis Perkins is singing about on his new disc, but the tunes seemed to work pretty well back to back. There's a rhythmic strumming at the base of the Elvis Perkins tune that brought to mind Joseph Arthur from one of the four EPs he put out last year, and both tracks can be heard in the old Cat Stevens song that followed. Finishing it off was DeVotchKa, with what's turned out to be my favorite track from last year's very appealing disc.

I recently had a chance to see Cadillac Records, which I liked, but I couldn't help noticing how many Chess artists weren't mentioned at all in the story it told. I'm guessing they could only fit as many people as they did into a normal length film, but clearly there were some pretty important names missing. One for sure was Bo Diddley, and the track that kicked off this final section sent us down something of a literary path, at least for the opening portion. So we had Elvis Costello & the Attractions with an alternate, more stripped-down version of one his more poppy numbers, the Monotones with their big hit from 1958 and Spoon with one that can be found on the Stranger Than Fiction soundtrack. From there a bit of hitting the road slowly worked its way into the theme, starting with Calexico taking a break from the rigors of writing, Minibar taking a break from themselves and the Beatles adding some magic to the mix. Then it was Vampire Weekend with a great rollicking track about beating feet from Cape Cod for New Jersey, which conjured up an old Sparks tune about a potential showdown if one party doesn't leave, and then it was on to the Caesars leaving the planet altogether (metaphorically speaking, of course).

Here's another one from Vampire Weekend


Program #569

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Gotta Serve Somebody . . . . . Slow Train Coming
ROBYN HITCHCOCK & THE VENUS 3 . . . . . What You is . . . . . Goodnight Oslo
PETER BJORN AND JOHN . . . . . Just The Past . . . . . Living Thing
THE BEATLES . . . . . Baby You’re A Rich Man . . . . . Magical Mystery Tour
LAL MERI . . . . . Take Me As I Am . . . . . Lal Meri
GROOVE ARMADA . . . . . Remember . . . . . Lovebox
BIG STAR . . . . . Nightime . . . . . Third/Sister Lovers

VAN MORRISON . . . . . Mechanical Bliss . . . . . 7-inch single
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . Bathtime In Clerkinwell . . . . . I, Lucifer
I AM KLOOT . . . . . Untitled #1 . . . . . I Am Kloot
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Hey . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
THE OLD 97’S . . . . . Dance With Me . . . . . Blame It On Gravity
DICK DALE & HIS DEL-TONES . . . . . Misirlou . . . . . The Perfect Day: The Music from 40 Years of Surfing Magazine
THE CRAMPS . . . . . Goo Goo Muck . . . . . Off the Bone
THE RAVEONETTES . . . . . Dead Sound . . . . . Lust Lust Lust
PRETTY GIRLS MAKE GRAVES . . . . . This Is Our Emergency . . . . . The New Romance

BOBBY DARIN . . . . . Beyond The Sea . . . . . The Hit Singles Collection
JOOLS HOLLAND & TAJ MAHAL . . . . . Outskirts Of Town . . . . . Jools Holland's Big Band Rhythm & Blues
THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND . . . . . Stormy Monday The Allman Brothers at Fillmore East
THE BLACK KEYS . . . . . So He Won’t Break . . . . . Attack and Release
THE KINKS . . . . . Set Me Free . . . . . Kinks-Size/Kinkdom
THE MINDERS . . . . . Jenny . . . . . It's a Bright Guilty World
CINDERPOP . . . . . Dead At The Side Of The Road . . . . . A Lesson in Science
TODD RUNDGREN . . . . . Couldn’t I Just Tell You . . . . . Something/Anything?
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . About You . . . . . Man-Made

MARIANNE FAITHFULL & KEITH RICHARDS . . . . . Sing Me Back Home . . . . . Easy Come, Easy Go
MERLE HAGGARD . . . . . The Bottle Let Me Down . . . . . Merle Haggard - 20 Greatest Hits
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON . . . . . Sunday Morning Coming Down . . . . . Kristofferson
CRACKER . . . . . Family Tradition . . . . . Countrysides
MIKE NESS . . . . . Dope Fiend Blues . . . . . Cheating at Solitaire
JOHN LENNON . . . . . Cold Turkey . . . . . Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon

A tune from Bob Dylan's born again period is where this program kicked off, and it was followed by a new one from Robyn Hitchcock & the Venus 3 that contains something of a lyrical resemblance. Then it was another new one, this time by Peter Bjorn and John that has more than a passing rhythmic similiarity to the Beatles tune that followed. One more new tune from Lal Meri kept the emphasis on the beat, and then Groove Armada offered up a haunting track that was helped greatly by a generous sample of a Sandy Denny vocal from an old Fairport Convention song, which led to a beautifully fragile piece by Alex Chilton from the final Big Star disc.

A relatively rare track from Van Morrison helped to lighten the mood to open this next set, as did the Real Tuesday Weld and I Am Kloot tunes that followed. A new one from Elvis Perkins with a bit of old-school rock 'n' roll buried inside segued nicely into an Old 97's track that features some very Dick Dale & His Del-Tones-like guitar. From there the general feel was maintained by the Cramps and the Raveonettes, and then it was Pretty Girls Make Graves providing an urgent note on which to finish.

This section began with my favorite Bobby Darin number after I read about the recent death at 96 of Jack Lawrence, who more than 60 years ago wrote the lyrics to what was originally a composition by a couple of French songwriters. The big band mood was sustained by Jools Holland, assisted by Taj Mahal on lead vocals, which added a bluesy note and led to the Allman Brothers classic version of T-Bone Walker's tune. Some more blues from the Black Keys was followed by mid-'60s Kinks that started to push the sound into more of a pop direction. The Minders continued down that path, and then it was Cinderpop veering off into a bit of Baroque & Roll, Todd Rundgren restoring the emphasis on guitars and Teenage Fanclub doing the same in two minutes forty, which they do as well as anyone ever has.

The finale began with a new one from Marianne Faithfull assisted by Keith Richards; it's certainly remarkable these two are still breathing, let alone singing together, after everything they've each been through since the halcyon days of Swinging London all those years ago. Here they're covering a Merle Haggard tune, so we heard from Merle to follow and then it was an old favorite by Kris Kristofferson that's the best tune I know about a hangover (and so much more, of course). Then it was Cracker covering Hank Williams, Jr. on what it takes to get to the place Kristofferson was writing and singing about, Mike Ness offering his take on addiction and John Lennon with a blow-by-blow of what it's like to kick, which seemed a good place shut it down.

Here's the flip side to "Baby You're A Rich Man"


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