Program #602

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE SPECIALS . . . . . International Jet Set . . . . . More Specials
THE POSTMARKS . . . . . Go Jetsetter . . . . .
BLONDIE . . . . . Sunday Girl . . . . . Parallel Lines
BERTRAND BURGALAT . . . . . Ma Rencontre . . . . . The Sssound of Mmmusic
ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM AND ELIS REGINA . . . . . Aguas de Marco (Waters Of March) . . . . . The Girl From Ipanema: The Antonio Carlos Jobim Songbook
LORENZO JOVANOTTI . . . . . Piove . . . . . The Sopranos - Peppers and Eggs: Music From The HBO Series
KRAFTWERK . . . . . Trans Europe Express . . . . . Trans-Europe Express

ARCTIC MONKEYS . . . . . Crying Lightning . . . . . Crying Lightning
CREAM . . . . . Tales Of Brave Ulysses) . . . . . Disraeli Gears
SUPERGRASS . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha Man . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha
ALICE COOPER . . . . . Under My Wheels . . . . . Killer
THE NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . ’Cause I Sez So . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Angela . . . . . Further Complications
THE DEATHRAY DAVIES . . . . . A Calendar Crime . . . . . The Kick and the Snare
THE COCKTAIL SLIPPERS . . . . . Gotta Crush . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Crush On You . . . . . The River
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . French Navy . . . . . My Maudlin Career

TIM BUCKLEY . . . . . Carnival Song . . . . . Goodbye and Hello
THE BEATLES . . . . . Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite . . . . . Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Remastered)
GROUCHO MARX . . . . . Lydia The Tattooed Lady . . . . . Demon in Disguise
ELVIS COSTELLO . . . . . Sulpher To Sugarcane . . . . . Secret, Profane and Sugarcane
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Country Honk . . . . . Let It Bleed
RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT . . . . . Richland Woman Blues . . . . . A Stranger Here
MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT . . . . . Candy Man . . . . . Revisited

WILCO . . . . . Sonny Feeling . . . . . Wilco (The Album)
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues . . . . . Highway 61 Revisited
FINIAN MCKEAN . . . . . Every Day That Passes . . . . . Shades Are Drawn
THE NATIONAL . . . . . So Far Around The Bend . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Scott Walker’s Fault . . . . . Killingsworth
SCOTT WALKER . . . . . Plastic Palace People . . . . . It's Raining Today: The Scott Walker Story (1967-70)

A new album from the Postmarks will be available in a little over a month; the disc's first single is a lot of fun, and it inspired a globetrotting opener that began with an old Specials tune about an especially perilous airplane flight. The Postmarks track reminded me of a favorite from Blondie, and Deborah Harry singing in French brought on some wonderful pop music from France by Bertrand Burgalat. From there we heard the sublime Bossa Nova sounds of Antonio Carlos Jobim and Elis Regina, which brought on Italy's Lorenzo Jovanotti with an atmospheric tune about love's rebirth. The transportation mode changed for the final track as Kraftwerk made their way across Europe.

Arctic Monkeys will also have a new disc at the end of August, and the first single is also quite appealing. I heard a bit of Cream in there, which was one of the bands they were listening to while making this new record, and then it was a Supergrass track from their last one that evokes a similar response for me. From there it was an old favorite from Alice Cooper bringing on one of the more New York Dolls-like tracks from that band's recent disc. Jarvis Cocker latest album supplied another great rocker, and then it was the Deathray Davies shifting the sound into slightly more of a pop direction. That trend continued with the Cocktail Slippers from their latest (produced by Steve Van Zandt) with a tune that quite naturally flows into an old Bruce Springsteen song (from a Steve Van Zandt co-produced record), which led to Camera Obscura pretty much expressing the same sentiments to finish it off.

As I've mentioned before, sometimes tunes appear in my brain from out of nowhere and stay on a continous loop; this time it was a very funny tune about a tattooed lady named Lydia that Groucho Marx first sang in the Marx Brothers picture At The Circus. Here we heard him at 81 singing it to conclude a Carnegie Hall performance from 1972 that consisted of him telling stories and singing songs from his life in show business. Carny-related tunes from Tim Buckley and the Beatles preceded Groucho, and following was a wonderful old David Bromberg track about a carnival dancing girl who proved irresistable to every man who saw her. The bawdiness of that one seemed to work well with the Elvis Costello tune that followed, and then it was the Rolling Stones with their country version of "Honky Tonk Woman" bringing on a couple of Mississippi John Hurt tunes—first by Ramblin' Jack Elliott from his recent release and then the old blues master himself recorded live at Oberlin College in 1965.

A new one from Wilco that expresses a certain sense of dislocation was followed by an old favorite from Bob Dylan. Then we heard Finian McKean documenting a downward spiral into one from the National that's very similar, both lyrically and musically. The Minus 5 attempting to pin it all on Scott Walker conjured up the man himself with one of his distinctive melodramas, which seemed a good a place as any to put this one to rest.

Here's another from Groucho Marx


Program #601

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . Everyone Says Hi . . . . . Heathen
ALL SMILES . . . . . The Brightest Beyond . . . . . The Brightest Beyond
ERIC LICHTER . . . . . Wildly Polite . . . . . Palm Wine Sunday Blue
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Feel Flows . . . . . Sunflower/Surf's Up
GRIZZLY BEAR . . . . . About Face . . . . . Veckatimest

BLACK WHALES . . . . . Roll With The Punches . . . . . Origins
IT HUGS BACK . . . . . Work Day . . . . . Inside Your Guitar
ORANGE PEELS . . . . . Mystery Lawn . . . . . So Far
THE WHO . . . . . I Can’t Explain . . . . . Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy
JOEY RAMONE . . . . . Maria Bartiromo . . . . . Don't Worry About Me
ART BRUT . . . . . Emily Kane . . . . . Bang Bang Rock & Roll
THE MEKONS . . . . . Where Were You? . . . . . No Thanks! The '70s Punk Rebellion
THE KINKS . . . . . All Day And All Of The Night . . . . . Kinks-Size/Kinkdom
THE CAESARS . . . . . Strawberry Weed . . . . . Strawberry Weed
NEIL DIAMOND . . . . . Cherry Cherry . . . . . In My Lifetime (3CD)

SONIC YOUTH . . . . . Antenna . . . . . The Eternal
BECK . . . . . Chemtrails . . . . . Modern Guilt
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Sing This All Together . . . . . Their Satanic Majesties Request
TRAFFIC . . . . . You Can All Join In . . . . . Traffic
THE BEATLES . . . . . All Together Now . . . . . Yellow Submarine (Remastered)
FEIST . . . . . 1234 . . . . . The Reminder
WILCO . . . . . You And I . . . . . Wilco (The Album)
DUSTY SPRINGFIELD . . . . . Wishing And Hoping . . . . . . . . . . The Very Best of Dusty Springfield
UB40 & CHRISSIE HYNDE . . . . . Breakfast In Bed . . . . . UB40
DISCOVERY . . . . . Slang Tang . . . . . LP
WAYNE SMITH . . . . . Under Me Sleng Teng . . . . . Original Riddims

STUART MURDOCH . . . . . Hiding ’Neath My Umbrella . . . . . God Help The Girl
DIONNE WARWICK . . . . . You’ll Never Get To Heaven (If You Break My Heart) . . . . . The Dionne Warwick Collection: Her All-Time Greatest Hits
THE SHARP THINGS . . . . . What’s The New Girl Wonder . . . . . A Moveable Feast
SOUTHSIDE JOHNNY & THE ASBURY JUKES . . . . . Talk To Me . . . . . The Best of Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes
THE COCKTAIL SLIPPERS . . . . . She’s A Fool . . . . . Saint Valentine's Day Massacre
POLLY SCATTERGOOD . . . . . Please Don’t Touch . . . . . Polly Scattergood
THE KING OF FRANCE . . . . . Beautiful Horses . . . . . The King of France
HARRY NILSSON . . . . . Me And My Arrow . . . . . Harry Nilsson - Greatest Hits
NEKO CASE . . . . . Don’t Forget Me . . . . . Middle Cyclone

This opener was one of those instances where the tracks ended up sounding better in reverse order from how it was originally constructed. I'm still enjoying Grizzly Bear's latest disc, and I liked the tune that finished this set coming out of the Beach Boys track that preceded it as opposed to the other way around. A favorite from Eric Lichter's debut solo disc made for a nice segue into the Beach Boys, and the track's delicate opening offered a seemless transition from All Smiles, whose tune otherwise had a melodic flow built on layered guitars, which presented a likeable juxtaposition from the more stately David Bowie tune at the top.

The next section began with Black Whales and It Hugs Back, two bands I've come across this year who both make some excellent guitar pop. The Orange Peels another group that has a great feel for that sound, and of course the Who in their early days were one of the originals. Although Pete Townshend wasn't sure what he was feeling, Joey Ramone had no trouble articulating his infatuation with Maria Bartiromo, which was followed by Art Brut with one of my favorite songs of this decade. An early favorite with some thundering guitar from the Mekons added a bit of accusatory insecurity to the mix, and then the Kinks took it to the level of obsession. A fruiy taste was the determining factor for the Caesars, which conjured up an old favorite from Neil Diamond that would seem to be linked in the produce department through its title, but clearly isn't (though that didn't stop me from playing it).

Quite a path was traveled in this set, as we began with some driving rock-pop from Sonic Youth's latest disc; the psychedelic touches on that one led to Beck with the his latest dive into that late '60s sound, which brought on the Rolling Stones with a classic from that era. Traffic was next with another from that time that shared an inclusive ethos, and then it was the Beatles offering a similar vibe while also supplying what I've also thought should be required listening in preschools everywhere. The same could be said of the Feist tune that followed, and from there we heard her joining Jeff Tweedy on one from Wilco's latest that seems to be a realistic look at how relationships work. Dusty Springfield had some relationship advice of her own (courtesy of Burt Bacharach and Hal David), and then we heard UB40 joined by Chrissie Hynde on a tune originally done by Dusty. A new one from Discovery seems to have found inspiration in both that UB40 cover and the seminal Wayne Smith track that finished up.

One from the latest Stuart Murdoch project brought to mind an old Dionne Warwick tune; I realize for some it's treading close to MOR territory, but on another level it's a perfect pop song (again courtesy of Bacharach and David). From there it was the Sharp Things with an uptempo favorite from their last release followed by Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes doing up a Bruce Springsteen number. That record was produced by Steve Van Zandt, who performed the same function for the Cocktail Slippers on their recent disc. Their excellent cover of a Lesley Gore tune fed nicely into Polly Scattergood's handclap-fueled track, and the fragility that seems central to her songwriting seemed to work well with the King of France tuned that followed. That one has a rhythm reminiscent of a song from an old animated TV special based on a story written by Harry Nilsson that featured his music, which led us to Neko Case's lovely cover of a Nilsson tune to close this one out.
Here's another one from Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes (and friends)


Program #600

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE RUTLES . . . . . Let’s Be Natural . . . . . The Rutles
OASIS . . . . . I’m Outta Time . . . . . Dig Out Your Soul
SEAN LENNON . . . . . Parachute . . . . . Friendly Fire (CD+DVD)
HONEYDOGS . . . . . Stonewall . . . . . Here's Luck
BECK . . . . . Nobody’s Fault But My Own . . . . . Mutations
ALL SMILES . . . . . All Tomorrow’s Parties . . . . . All You Are Is A Human Sir
THE BEATLES . . . . . You Never Give Me Your Money . . . . . Abbey Road (Remastered)

JOY DIVISION . . . . . Love Will Tear Us Apart . . . . . Love Will Tear Us Apart
THE HELIO SEQUENCE . . . . . Keep Your Eyes Ahead . . . . . Keep Your Eyes Ahead
NEW ROMAN TIMES . . . . . Smoke In Your Disguise . . . . . On The Sleeve
BLACK WHALES . . . . . Running In Place . . . . . Origins
VAMPIRE WEEKEND . . . . . Walcott . . . . . Vampire Weekend
SPARKS . . . . . This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us . . . . . Kimono My House
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Actor Out Of Work . . . . . Actor
PRINCE & THE REVOLUTION . . . . . Baby I’m A Star . . . . . Music from the Motion Picture "Purple Rain"
PATRICK WOLF . . . . . The Magic Position . . . . . The Bachelor

SPOON . . . . . Got Nuffin . . . . . Got Nuffin
THE FLAMIN’ GROOVIES . . . . . Shake Some Action . . . . .
ELVIS COSTELLO . . . . . (The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes . . . . . My Aim Is True
EELS . . . . . My Timing Is Off . . . . . Hombre Lobo: 12 Songs of Desire
THE PERNICE BROTHERS . . . . . Discover A Lovelier You . . . . . Discover a Lovelier You
THE SANDALS . . . . . Theme From “ Endless Summer” . . . . . The Perfect Day: The Music from 40 Years of Surfing Magazine
THE WIPEOUTERS . . . . . Nubbie Boardsmen . . . . . P' Twaaang!!!
THE TRASHMEN . . . . . Surfin’ Bird . . . . . Grandson of Frat Rock!, Vol. 3
THE B-52’S . . . . . Rock Lobster . . . . . Time Capsule

WILCO . . . . . Bull Black Nova . . . . . Wilco (The Album)
DAR WILLIAMS . . . . . Highway Patrolman . . . . . Badlands: A Tribute To Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska
DAVID BROMBERG . . . . . Dehlia . . . . . David Bromberg
BLIND WILLIE MCTELL . . . . . Three Women Blues . . . . . Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 1 (1927-1931)
THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND . . . . . Statesboro Blues . . . . . The Allman Brothers at Fillmore East

Allen Klein passed away on July 4th; he was a business manager who had a major impact on the business of rock & roll, although more for what he told his clients than what he actually did for them. His pitch was that he could extract more money from record companies by scouring the books and renegotiating contracts, and he managed to convince some major artists—Bobby Darin and Sam Cooke early on, then most prominently the Rolling Stones and eventually the biggest prize of all, the Beatles—to use his services. To his credit, he made it possible for naive musicians who knew nothing of the record business to eventually be ripped off less by the major companies. What all of them eventually discovered, however, was that Klein always placed his interests above those of his clients, even as he did manage to secure them more favorable returns on their work. His style was to bully everyone he wasn't trying to sign to a contract, which inevitably left him with few friends and plenty of enemies. When I read of his death, I immediately thought of the perfect satirization of Klein in the Rutles film, where John Belushi as Ron Decline (flanked by his henchmen, Tom Davis & Senator Al Franken) left employees quaking under their desks after he entered the Rutle Corps headquarters for the first time. And then, of course, there was the tune Paul McCartney wrote after leaving the meeting where he was the only Beatle to not sign the management contract with Klein, which really was the final straw that broke that camel's back. In between we heard one from Oasis that mixes in a John Lennon interview snippet, Sean Lennon working within territory originally staked out by his dad's band, Honeydogs with a nod to the Walrus, Beck looking back through the haze to those days as well and All Smiles exhibiting a fondness for Fab Four-like harmonies.

This set began with Joy Division's alternate take of what proved to be their final single while Ian Curtis was still alive. Apparently the other three band members had asked him to sing the song like Frank Sinatra, and although the result is not as despondent as the true A side, the tune still retains its irresistable sense of momentum. Everything that followed here keyed off of that, with the Helio Sequence galloping into new music from New Roman Times and Black Whales, both of which are new to me. Vampire Weekend put the emphasis on piano with one that recalls an old favorite from Sparks; then we had St. Vincent cranking up the synths and building to a place where Prince & the Revolution took over before Patrick Wolf closed it out with some thoughts on what makes that certain someone so appealing.

Spoon recently put out a three-song single and here we began with the A-side, which has nice prominent drums bashing out a big beat and a bit of guitar that reminded me of an old Flamin' Groovies track. Following that was Elvis Costello with my favorite from his 1977 debut, and that led to one from the new disc by Eels with a great pop feel. A trio of instrumentals was next, starting with the Pernice Brothers offering some more pop melodicism into the Sandals with their track from the primordial surfing movie The Endless Summer, which led to the Wipeouters skewed yet affectionate take on the "surfing sound." From there it was the Trashmen with their 1964 hit, and then the B-52's with the original 7-inch version of the song that caught everybody's ear in 1978.

The final section began with one from Wilco's latest that apparently has Jeff Tweedy inhabiting someone who's just murdered his girlfriend. It conjured up an old Bruce Springsteen track, but here we heard Dar Williams version from a Springsteen tribute disc that goes back several years. David Bromberg followed with a traditional number that has been described as "the saddest song ever written"; in it he mentions a Blind Willie McTell version that he'd heard, so that's who was up next before the Allman Brothers Band covering one of McTell's best-known songs closed this one out.

Here are two bits featuring Ron Decline from the Rutles film


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