Program #584

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . It’s All Over Now . . . . . 12 X 5
HOWLIN’ WOLF . . . . . Smokestack Lightnin’ . . . . . The Best of Chess Blues, Vol. 1
TOM WAITS . . . . . Get Behind The Mule . . . . . Mule Variations
RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT . . . . . Soul Of A Man . . . . . A Stranger Here
THE KRONOS QUARTET . . . . . Dark Was The Night . . . . . Dark Was the Night
BOB DYLAN . . . . . My Wife’s Hometown . . . . . Together Through Life
DAVID BROMBERG . . . . . Suffer To Sing The Blue . . . . . David Bromberg

X-RAY SPECS . . . . . Oh Bondage, Up Yours! . . . . . Germ Free Adolescents
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Homewrecker . . . . . Further Complications
MIKE NESS . . . . . Misery Loves Company . . . . . Cheating at Solitaire
THE RAVONETTES . . . . . Blitzed . . . . . Lust Lust Lust
SISTER VANILLA . . . . . Jamcolas . . . . . Little Pop Rock
BIG STAR . . . . . Kizza Me . . . . . Third/Sister Lovers
THE CAESARS . . . . . Waking Up . . . . . Strawberry Weed
MARTIN NEWELL . . . . . She Rings The Changes . . . . . The Greatest Living Englishman
ROBYN HITCHCOCK . . . . . Your Head Here . . . . . Goodnight Oslo

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Two Faces . . . . . Tunnel of Love
RICK NELSON . . . . . Lonely Town . . . . . Rick Nelson - Greatest Hits
NEKO CASE . . . . . Middle Cyclone . . . . . Middle Cyclone
JOHN CALE . . . . . Gravel Drive . . . . . Black Acetate
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Just The Same But Brand New . . . . . Actor
BRIAN ENO . . . . . Silver Morning . . . . . Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks
STUART MURDOCH . . . . . Come Monday Night . . . . . free download
THE SHINS . . . . . Sleeping Lessons . . . . . Wincing the Night Away

NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . Trash . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So
UB40 & CHRISSIE HYNDE . . . . . Breakfast In Bed . . . . . UB40
LONE RANGER . . . . . Love Bump . . . . . The Best of Studio One, Vol. 2: Full Up
BUNNY WAILER . . . . . Ballroom Floor . . . . . Rock'n'Groove
THE JA-MAN ALL STARS . . . . . Downtown Rubadub . . . . . In the Dub Zone
CAIRO . . . . . I Like Bluebeat . . . . . 100% British Ska
THE CHANTELLS . . . . . Natty Supper . . . . . Dubwise & Otherwise 2: A Blood and Fire Audio Catalogue
LINTON KWESI JOHNSON . . . . . Making History . . . . . Independant Intavenshan: The Island Anthology
BOB MARLEY AND THE WAILERS . . . . . Blackman Redemption . . . . . Confrontation

After a Rolling Stones cover from the early days of a Bobby Womack tune, this show moved deeper into the blues for the remainder of this opening set. So we had a classic recorded at the Chess studios in Chicago in the mid-'50s from Howlin' Wolf followed by Tom Waits in a country blues place with a tune inspired by something that Robert Johnson's father once said of his son. From there it was a couple of Blind Willie Johnson tunes: the first from the excellent new Ramblin' Jack Elliott disc and the second performed in a harrowing version by the Kronos Quartet from the recent two-disc set devoted to raising money and awareness to continue the battle agains HIV and AIDS. Bob Dylan followed with a new tune that essentially borrows the music from Willie Dixon's "I Just Want To Make Love To You," and then it was David Bromberg with an original that explains why life's setbacks can be valuable to a bluesman.

This next section kicked off with the initial single release from X-Ray Spex in 1977; it came to mind after I heard the new Jarvis Cocker track that followed, with a blaring sax that approached the kinetic energy supplied by Lora Logic during her short stay in X-Ray Spex. Mike Ness (with some help from Bruce Springsteen) made it three saxophone-dominated songs in a row, and then it was the Raveonettes with one of their echoy, reverb-drenched specialties. Sister Vanilla likes to keep it noisy as well, and the overall looseness on this track conjured Big Star near the end of their initial run. The Caesars added a nice dose of guitar-driven pop, as did Martin Newell (along with Andy Partridge) and then it was Robyn HItchcock & the Venus 3 with one of his patented lyrically playful tracks to finish up.

Bruce Springsteen on his own to begin this set offered the first in a quartet of sad, regreful tunes that led next to an old one from a young Rick Nelson, a new one from Neko Case that also lends its title to her album and a recent one from John Cale that manages to quote the TV show Survivor in its lyrics without ruining the song. The atmosphere on that one fed nicely into a new song from St. Vincent that seems to be about moving on into a new place; the tune has a floating texture that brought to mind a Brian Eno track from music he composed for a film compiled of footage taken by Apollo astronauts during the lunar missions in the late '60s and early '70s. From there it was on to a new one by Stuart Murdoch; the song is from an upcoming album that will not be released as a Belle and Sebastian record, and the singer is named Catherine Ireton, who got the gig by auditioning for Murdoch. Finally it was the Shins with a track that builds to a rousing finish, which felt like a good place to stop.

On their terrific new disc the New York Dolls remake one of their best-loved tunes from the early days, this time with a classic reggae beat attached to it. That was all it took to become immersed in Jamaica's most-beloved export, so we had UB40 assisted by Chrissie Hynde followed by the Lone Ranger out of Studio One leading to Bunny Wailer with a tune from my favorite of his many solo discs. From there it was a bit of dub from the Ja-Man All Stars into a bit of serendipity from 1980 by Cairo followed by the Chantells injecting a bit of culture into the mix. That's where Linton Kwesi Johnson and Bob Marley and the Wailers from the first posthumous release after his death kept us, and that's when the lights went dark on this program.

Here's another one from Linton Kwesi Johnson


Program #583

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
KRAFTWERK . . . . . Autobahn . . . . . Autobahn
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Inaugural Trams . . . . . Dark Days/Light Years
THE KINKS . . . . . (Wish I Could Fly Like) Superman . . . . . Low Budget
LEONARD COHEN . . . . . First We Take Manhattan . . . . . Live In London
NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS . . . . . Hold On To Yourself . . . . . Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!
BOB DYLAN . . . . . It’s All Good . . . . . Together Through Life

NEIL YOUNG . . . . . A Man Needs A Maid . . . . . Live at Massey Hall 1971
NEIL HALSTEAD . . . . . Paint A Face . . . . . Oh! Mighty Engine
THE WOODEN BIRDS . . . . . Bad . . . . . Magnolia
NICK DRAKE . . . . . Hazy Jane I . . . . . Bryter Layter
THE HEADLESS HEROES . . . . . The North Wind Blue South . . . . . Silence of Love
TOM RUSH . . . . . No Regrets/Rockport Sunday . . . . . Classic Rush
WILCO . . . . . Either Way . . . . . Sky Blue Sky

BRASSTRONAUT . . . . . Requiem For A Scene . . . . . Old World Lies
THE SHARP THINGS . . . . . She Left With The Sun . . . . . Foxes and Hounds
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . The Sweetest Thing . . . . . My Maudlin Career
THE TEMPTATIONS . . . . . Since I Lost My Baby . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
THE BEATLES . . . . . You Really Got A Hold On Me . . . . . With the Beatles
THE SIGHTS . . . . . Don’t Want You Back . . . . . Got What We Want
BADFINGER . . . . . Baby Blue . . . . . The Best Of Badfinger
NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . Lonely So Long . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So

ST. VINCENT . . . . . The Strangers . . . . . Actor
RADIOHEAD . . . . . Weird Fishes/Arpeggi . . . . . In Rainbows
JOY DIVISION . . . . . These Days . . . . . These Days
INTERPOL . . . . . Say Hi To The Angels . . . . . Turn on the Bright Lights
BLACK LIPSTICK . . . . . Serpentz . . . . . Converted Thieves
ART BRUT . . . . . Am I Normal? . . . . . Art Brut vs. Satan

This edition of the Lucky Dog Radio show hit the road with an old favorite from Kraftwerk; I still find it remarkable that this music became as popular as it did back there in the mid-'70s, and of course it wouldn't have happened without FM radio playing it consistently. Of course, those days are long gone, but luckily for you and me Internet radio has stepped in to fill that hole in the listening universe. After Kraftwerk we had Super Furry Animals from their new album having some fun with the German wing of the Eurodisco universe, followed by the Kinks' exploration of the disco beat from 30 years ago. The track is on a disc that reflected Ray Davies' reaction to the many ills afflicting society back then, which were similar in many ways to what we're experiencing right now. From there it was on to Leonard Cohen in a vaguely apocalyptic mood followed by Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds with what appears to be a reasonable approach in hard times and Bob Dylan borrowing a recently minted cliche to appropriate sardonic effect.

Some folks looking for love and struggling to find it was what this next set was all about, starting with Neil Young in concert merging a couple of tunes that would later be separated when his next album came out. From there it was another Neil with one of my favorites from his last disc followed by new music by the Wooden Birds, which is the current project from Andrew Kenny of American Analog Set. A lovely early-'70s folk-pop classic from Nick Drake led to the Headless Heroes covering a tune that dates to around the same time, which seemed to perfectly set up a pair of tunes from Tom Rush. Originally on his disc The Circle Game, they were resequenced on Classic Rush; as a result, the resigned sense of sorrow and bewilderment permeating the first track is reinforced by the beautiful instrumental that follows. At the end it was Wilco trying to be hopeful about accepting what must be.

The subject shifted more to endings in this section, starting with a new one from Brasstronaut that features a haunting trumpet used for accent throughtout. The Sharp Things included a bit of that horn as well, along with some strings that made for a nice flow into Camera Obscura. The strings on that one conjured up an old favorite from the Temptations, followed by the Beatles covering Motown. Then it was the Sights incorporating some of that early Beatles sound, Badfinger following with one of their big hits and new music from the New York Dolls on which they sound positively British Invasion-ish.

The final section began with St. Vincent from the new disc with a track that sounds as if it might float away if it weren't for the forward momentum of the beat. From there the music gradually grew noisier as we had Radiohead seeking a way out, Joy Division try to reconcile the present with the past, Interpol seemingly confused about where things stand, Black Lipstick getting ready to make their move and Art Brut so hesitant that the only answer seems to come in the form of a question.

Here's another one from Neil Young


Program #582

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE ESSEX . . . . . Easier Said Than Done . . . . . The Best of the Girl Groups, Vol. 2
CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Swans . . . . . My Maudlin Career
SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES . . . . . The Tears Of A Clown . . . . . Motown: The Classic Years
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . It Hurts To Be Alone . . . . . Causes 2
JERRY BUTLER . . . . . Mr. Dream Merchant . . . . . Soul Shots, Vol. 2: A Collection of 60s Soul Classics
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Baby’s Coming Back To Me . . . . . Jarvis
ROY ORBISON . . . . . You Got It . . . . . For The Lonely: 18 Greatest Hits
NEKO CASE . . . . . This Tornado Loves You . . . . . Middle Cyclone
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Lillian, Egypt . . . . . Animal Years

ART BRUT . . . . . The Replacements . . . . . Art Brut vs. Satan
THE REPLACEMENTS . . . . . Bastards Of Young . . . . . Tim
THE BREEDERS . . . . . Fate To Fatal . . . . . Fate To Fatal
BETTIE SERVEERT . . . . . Smack . . . . . Log 22
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . Be My Wife . . . . . Low
ST. VINCENT . . . . . Save Me From What I Want . . . . . Actor
JONI MITCHELL . . . . . Help Me . . . . . Court and Spark
RICHARD BUCKNER . . . . . Lucky . . . . . Meadow
THE BYRDS . . . . . Ballad Of Easy Rider . . . . . Ballad of Easy Rider
EELS . . . . . Railroad Man . . . . . Blinking Lights And Other Revelations

B.B. KING . . . . . The Thrill Is Gone . . . . . The Ultimate Collection
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Forgetful Heart . . . . . Together Through Life
GIANT SAND . . . . . Stranded Pearl . . . . . proVISIONS
THE HEADLESS HEROES . . . . . Just One Time . . . . . Silence of Love
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN . . . . . Meeting Across The River . . . . . Born To Run: 30th Anniversary 3-Disc Set (CD/2DVD)
JOE HENRY . . . . . Flesh & Blood . . . . . Tiny Voices
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . Hours Last Stand . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland

NEW YORK DOLLS . . . . . ’Cause I Sez So . . . . . 'Cause I Sez So
IAN HUNTER . . . . . Once Bitten Twice Shy . . . . . Ian Hunter
VUE . . . . . People On The Stairs . . . . . Find Your Home
THE YARDBIRDS . . . . . Happenings Ten Years Time Ago . . . . . Roger the Engineer
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Inconvenience . . . . . Dark Days/Light Years
PAUL MCCARTNEY . . . . . Magneto & Titanium Man . . . . . Venus and Mars
RICHARD SWIFT . . . . . Atlantic Ocean . . . . . The Atlantic Ocean
THE APPLES IN STEREO . . . . . Shine A Light . . . . . Tone Soul Evolution
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Add Some Music To Your Day . . . . . Sunflower/Surf's Up

THis one opened with the big hit in the summer of 1963 for a group of Marines who called themselves the Essex; it came to mind when I first heard the Camera Obscura track that followed, as did the Smokey Robinson & the Miracles tune that came next. The Sharon Jones and the Dap-KIngs song is an old-school soul ballad from a new disc full of donated tunes; all of its profits will go to groups such as Doctors Without Borders that are bringing aid to Darfur. From there it was an old favorite from Jerry Butler into one from Jarvis Cocker where it seems his dream actually did come true. Roy Orbison kept the positive vibe flowing, and then it was Neko Case with a meteorologically anchored tune of frustrated love into a bit of a tall tale about a lively lass from Josh Ritter that's set in the days of the silent pictures.

Art Brut on the joy of discovering music (even if you're more than a quarter century late) began this section, and then it was one from the band that Eddie Argos named his song for flowing into a new one from the Breeders. After that we had Bettie Serveert with a tune that always brings to mind Low-era David Bowie, which was followed by one from the terrific new St. Vincent disc that conjured up Joni Mitchell for reasons both sonic and thematic. Richard Buckner searching for some answers brought on the Byrds with the track that played over the end credits of Easy Rider, which is now 40 years old (yikes!), and then it was Eels finishing up with a similarly flowing tune that certainly hits home for anyone who's felt a little dislocated out there on the tracks of time.

A favorite from B.B. King came to mind because I heard a bit of it in the new track from Bob Dylan that followed. From there it was Giant Sand contemplating love gone sour flowing nicely into one from the Headless Heroes that has a similarly dusty desert night feel to it . . . along with a trumpet that immediately evoked Bruce Springsteen's moody New Jersey vignette, which was followed by a Joe Henry track that has a Springsteenian feel to it that brought us to Elvis Perkins with a rather bleak one from his latest to finish this section off.

The title track from the latest New York Dolls album takes you right back to their early days, even though David Johansen and Sylvain Sylvain are the only original members still with us. It led to Ian Hunter with one from his first solo disc that has a similar energy, which was followed by Vue adding a hint of electric blues to the mix. Then it was the Yardbirds, with one of only three tracks recorded that include both Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page, followed by some new Super Furry Animals with a rhythmic bounce that segued smoothly into Wings-era Paul McCartney. The mood was maintained by Richard Swift with the title tune from his new disc, and then it was a relatively early pop-rock gem from the Apples In Stereo bringing on the Beach Boys with some unparalleled words of wisdom to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one from Joe Henry


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