Program #567

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . When Irish Eyes Are Burning . . . . . We Belong to the Staggering Evening
THE YOUNG DUBLINERS . . . . . Rosie . . . . . Saints And Sinners
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Rosalita . . . . . Hammersmith Odeon, London '75 (2CD)
OTIS REDDING . . . . . I Can’t Turn You Loose . . . . . Live in London and Paris
SHARON JONES & THE DAP KINGS . . . . . My Man Is A Mean Man . . . . . Naturally
GRAHAM PARKER & THE RUMOUR . . . . . Heat Treatment . . . . . Heat Treatment
VAN MORRISON . . . . . Jackie Wilson Said (I’m In Heaven When You Smile) . . . . . Saint Dominic's Preview

JOSEPH ARTHUR . . . . . Slow Me Down . . . . . Vagabond Skies
MARK LANEGAN . . . . . Kimiko’s Dream House . . . . . Field Songs
PJ HARVEY . . . . . Black Hearted Love . . . . . A Woman, A Man, Walked By
RACHAEL YAMAGATA . . . . . Sidedish . . . . . Elephants...Teeth Sinking Into Heart (2 CD)
DIGBY . . . . . Too Late . . . . . Falling Up
THE WHO . . . . . Substitute . . . . . Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy
MOJAVE 3 . . . . . Ghost Ship Waiting . . . . . Puzzles Like You
BUZZCOCKS . . . . . What Do I Get? . . . . . Operators Manual
FOUNTAINS OF WAYNE . . . . . Little Red Light . . . . . Welcome Interstate Managers

GIANT SAND . . . . . Out There . . . . . proVISIONS
THE VELVET UNDERGROUND . . . . . Pale Blue Eyes . . . . . The Velvet Underground
M. WARD . . . . . Outro . . . . . Hold Time
JIMI HENDRIX . . . . . Little Wing . . . . . The Jimi Hendrix Concerts
THE RACONTEURS . . . . . Rich Kid Blues . . . . . Consolers Of The Lonely
JENNY LEWIS . . . . . Jack Killed Mom . . . . . Acid Tongue
JOE COCKER . . . . . Cry Me A River . . . . . Mad Dogs & Englishmen

THE LIFE AND TIMES . . . . . The Lucid Dream . . . . . Tragic Boogie
NEKO CASE . . . . . Prison Girls . . . . . Middle Cyclone
MOS DEF . . . . . Kalifornia . . . . . Biker Boyz
JOHN MAYALL . . . . . California . . . . . The Turning Point
THELONIOUS MONK . . . . . Mysterioso . . . . . Live at the It Club

With St. Paddy's Day upon us, this show began with a couple of timely tunes from the Ike Reilly Assassination and the Young Dubliners, whose track brought forth Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band (for obvious title reasons). The extraordinary energy in that live performance was matched by Otis Redding, and then it was the modern-day soul/r&b of Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings followed by Graham Parker & the Rumour aided by some bright soul horns. Van Morrison provided the perfect closer with his homage to Jackie Wilson—and seeing as how he hails from the Emerald Isle, it was doubly perfect.

This section started with yet another group of tunes about love gone wrong—it's hard to resist as there are so many and the combinations are endless. So we had Joseph Arthur in a hurry to get somewhere alone, Mark Lanegan not sure where he is, one from PJ Harvey's upcoming disc with a title that's self explanatory, Rachael Yamagata willing to make a commitment that only goes so far, Digby smack dab in the middle of the set with a track that pretty much sums it all up, the Who with a clear-eyed assessment of the situation, Mojave 3 taking on water, the Buzzcocks asking a pertinent musical question and Fountains of Wayne unable to connect despite the many helpful modern devices on hand.

The opener from Giant Sand set a mood of questioning and loss that flowed quite well into an old one from the Velvet Underground that remains as intimate a song as I can recall hearing anywhere. M. Ward with an instrumental version of an old standard called "I'm A Fool To Want You" segued nicely into one of Jimi Hendrix's most beautiful tunes, and then it was the Raconteurs covering Terry Reid followed by Jenny Lewis with a Jack White-like tune that ends in a soulful, gospel-like place, which is how we ended up with Joe Cocker to finish.

The Life And Times are new to me, and their upcoming disc has a track that seemed to work well with the foreboding mood of the Neko Case track that followed. The dream state continued with Mos Def, which was followed by an old one from John Mayall with (almost) the same name that fed beautifully into a gem from Thelonious Monk that put the capper on this one. Here's another one from the Ike Reilly Assassination


Program #566

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
JAMES BROWN . . . . . It’s A Man’s Man’s Man’s World . . . . . Star Time (4CD)
CAT POWER . . . . . Lost Someone . . . . . Jukebox - Deluxe Edition
ARETHA FRANKLIN . . . . . Since You’ve Been Gone (Sweet Sweet Baby) . . . . . The Golden Age of Black Music: 1960-1970
FINE YOUNG CANNIBALS . . . . . Suspicious Minds . . . . . Fine Young Cannibals
ELVIS COSTELLO & THE ATTRACTIONS . . . . . Lipstick Vogue . . . . . This Year's Model
A.C. NEWMAN . . . . . The Heartbreak Rides . . . . . Get Guilty
THE SHINS . . . . . Pressed In A Book . . . . . Oh, Inverted World
THE MOVE . . . . . Blackberry Way . . . . . The Best of the Move
THE CAESARS . . . . . Turn It Off . . . . . Strawberry Weed
THE WHO . . . . . So Sad About Us . . . . . Quick One (Happy Jack)

NEKO CASE . . . . . Middle Cyclone . . . . . Middle Cyclone
TIM HARDIN . . . . . Don’t Make Promises . . . . . Hang on to a Dream: The Verve Recordings
THE BOOKS FEATURING JOSE GONZALEZ . . . . . Cello Song . . . . . Dark Was the Night
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right . . . . . The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
WILCO . . . . . Either Way . . . . . Sky Blue Sky
JIMMIE DALE GILMORE . . . . . Tonight I Think I’m Gonna Go Downtown . . . . . After Awhile
ROY ORBISON . . . . . Crying . . . . . For The Lonely: 18 Greatest Hits
RICHARD HAWLEY . . . . . Something Is . . . . . . . . Late Night Final
THE WATSON TWINS . . . . . Only You . . . . . Fire Songs
M. WARD . . . . . Hold Time . . . . . Hold Time

BLACK LIPS . . . . . Take My Heart . . . . . 200 Million Thousand
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE . . . . . She Has Funny Cars . . . . . Surrealistic Pillow
22-20s . . . . . Why Don’t Do You Do It For Me . . . . . 22-20s
TEN YEARS AFTER . . . . . I’m Going Home . . . . . Woodstock
ELVIS PRESLEY . . . . . I Wanna Play House With You . . . . . THE FIRST LIVE RECORDINGS [LP VINYL]
SPOON . . . . . Well-Alright . . . . . Dark Was the Night
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . It’s All Over Now . . . . . 12 X 5
JAMES HUNTER . . . . . Don’t Do Me No Favors . . . . . The Hard Way

THE BEATLES . . . . . I’m Only Sleeping . . . . . 200 Million Thousand
FRANZ FERDINAND . . . . . Dream Again . . . . . Tonight:Franz Ferdinand
TOM WAITS . . . . . Innocent When You Dream (Barroom) . . . . . Franks Wild Years
ELVIS PERKINS . . . . . I’ll Be Arriving . . . . . Elvis Perkins in Dearland
DUKE ELLINGTON . . . . . East Saint Louis Toodle-Oo . . . . . Ken Burns JAZZ Collection: Duke Ellington
THE MONKEES . . . . . Tapioca Tundra . . . . . The Birds, the Bees & the Monkees
EELS . . . . . Trouble With Dreams . . . . . Blinking Lights And Other Revelations
DJANGO REINHARDT . . . . . I’ll See In You In My Dreams . . . . . The Best of Django Reinhardt

It felt like too much time had passed since James Brown had been part of the LDR program mix, so after starting with one from the Hardest Working Man In Show Business, it was Cat Power covering a James Brown tune followed by Aretha Franklin with one of her special tracks from the Atlantic years. The thread of romance gone bad continued with Fine Young Cannibals remake of Elvis Presley's final No. 1 hit into Elvis Costello & the Attractions with a highlight from the early days. A favorite from A.C. Newman's latest disc was followed by one from the Shins with a similar feel, which led to the Move, who often come to mind when I'm listening to the Shins. Then it was on to the Caesars from their last disc, and then the Who taking us back to the main theme with a track that is still irresistible all these years later.

Neko Case seeking something that isn't meant to be on the title track from her new album flowed nicely into an old one on the same subject from Tim Hardin. The idea was carried forward with the Books featuring Jose Gonzalez covering a Nick Drake tune; the synth pattern on that one was remarkably similar to Bob Dylan's finger-picked guitar on one from his second disc. From there it was Wilco trying to find acceptance of the situation, whatever may happen; Jimmie Dale Gilmore attempting to find a remedy through some outside distraction; Roy Orbison realizing he was still hopelessly in love; Richard Hawley trying to put a calm spin on what simply must be; the Watson Twins searching for clarity and M. Ward capturing and holding onto a feeling forever.

A new one from the Black Lips brought forth an old tune with a similar rhythm from Jefferson Airplane, which was followed by the 22-20s doing their English blues-based thing. One of the more famous examples of that was the performance by Ten Years After at Woodstock, during which Alvin Lee quotes from a few tunes, including one done by Elvis Presley very early on in his career. Spoon's latest track is built on a prime rock 'n' roll sound and seemed to flow well into the Rolling Stones with their first No. 1 in Britain from a long time ago, and then it was the 21st-century R&B of James Hunter to finish up.

A few nights worth of some rather vivid dreams inspired this last section, starting with one by the Beatles that features a bit of backwards guitar leading to a new track from Franz Ferdinand that does a nice job of describing the dream state. Then it was Tom Waits with a timeless declaration that rings eternally true, which was followed by a trio of tunes from Elvis Perkins, Duke Ellington and the Monkees that feel more like soundtracks to dreams than actually about the subject themselves. The end began with a take on the downside of dreams courtesy of Eels before the light touch of Django Reinhardt brought us home. Here's another one from Roy Orbison


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